Tag Archives: Furniture

Blue and White: Chinese Porcelain, 1650 to 1900

Untitled, Unknown; Crane Scroll
Untitled, Unknown; Crane Scroll

April 26 – May 21, 1985

Maltwood Art  Museum and Gallery

In 1650 a new appreciation for natural beauty arose and Chinese potters expressed this love of nature through cobalt blue designs of flora and fauna.

In the 17th century, a mass industry of exports to the West was established, which was the only source of “china” in Europe for a long time. Chinese porcelain became an enviable domestic possession and had a great influence on Western ceramic art.

The porcelain was drawn from a private collection. The John and Katharine Maltwood collection provided Chinese hanging scrolls and furniture for the exhibition.

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400 Years of Furniture from the Maltwood Collection

May 24 – July 8, 1984

Maltwood Art Gallery

An exhibition of furniture bequeathed to the gallery by Katharine Emma Maltwood. The collection features styles ranging from Tudor to Arts and Crafts seen on Canadian, British, Chinese, Italian, Dutch and Turkish furniture.

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Hand Crafted: Contemporary Decorative Arts in B.C., 1950 to 1970

Glazed Ceramic Chicken, Thomas Kakinuma, 1950s-1960s

Glazed Ceramic Chicken, Thomas Kakinuma, 1950s-1960s

June 16 – August 14, 1983

Maltwood Art Museum and Gallery

Exhibition of regional arts, furniture, pottery and weaving by prominent artists including Mungo Martin, Wayne Ngan, Peter Cotton and Herbert Siebner.

The majority of art works featured in this exhibition are drawn from the Fitzgerald Collection, recently acquired by the Maltwood. Originally, this impressive collection of West Coast hand crafts was acquired during the 1950s and 60s by Bessie Fitzgerald, the former proprietor of the Quest chain of handicraft shops in Victoria, Vancouver, Banff, and Calgary. Fitzgerald was among the first to support and actively promote the decorative arts in Western Canada.

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Chairs: 400 Years of Social and Stylistic Changes

May 5 – June 12, 1983

Maltwood Art Gallery

The many stylistic, industrial, and social evolution are encapsulated in this exhibition which features 35 chairs. The chairs, from the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, span the period from Renaissance to post-World War II. The exhibition examines society and changing uses of the chair throughout history, while also tracing the development of the furniture trade from its origins as a guild structure to its current status as a modern industry.

The Cabinet Maker/Designer: An Exhibition

August 4 – September 27, 1982

Maltwood Art Gallery

This collection, the work of 22 Vancouver Island craftspersons, reintroduces hand-crafted custom furnishings as an art form in its own right. All the pieces represent, with varying degrees of emphasis, the search of the craftsperson for a good aesthetic solution based on a personal judgement to resolve issues of function, comfort, cost of production and materials technology within the expectations of a clientele. As such this group stand typically within one of the two streams of contemporary furniture design; Modern design and English vernacular design.

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The Maltwood Arts and Crafts Collection

972.13.1a/b Two Candlesticks F.W. Vienna Austria

972.13.1a/b Two Candlesticks F.W. Vienna Austria

September 5 – October 6, 1978

University Centre

Curated by Professor Martin Segger

View the online catalogue:

The Maltwood Arts and Crafts Collection – Catalogue

The Arts-and-Crafts Movement began in the middle the nineteenth century as an attempt to get away from the practice of borrowing forms from historic styles and to base design instead on intrinsic properties of materials and structure.

The Arts & Crafts principle of natural expression of material and structure can be seen in architecture, in its emphasis on exposed structure (half-timber work in the walls), and evidences of hand craftsmanship (adaze marks on the exposed beams). It is likewise evident in a new interest in old, vernacular furniture with its preference for sturdy construction and rough-grained materials like oak; it appears in the emphasis on the fabric of textiles; the special qualities of matte glazes in ceramics; and the patina of jewelry and metalwork.

Perhaps the best-known offshoot of this international style is Art Nouveau; its sensuous curves and flat patterns derive directly from certain Arts & Crafts principles which continue to influence all architecture and design of today.

Inaugural Exhibition

Katharine Maltwood - Olympic Mountains from Oak Bay Golf Club
Katharine Maltwood – Olympic Mountains from Oak Bay Golf Club, September 1978

September 1, 1978

Maltwood Art Museum and Gallery

The first exhibition of the Maltwood Collection at its University Centre exhibition space. The collection includes pieces curated by John and Katharine Maltwood, as well as original sculptures and drawings by Katharine Maltwood.