Tag Archives: Indigenous

Out of Place

Solo exhibition by Connie Morey

July 2 – Sept 17, 2022

Legacy Downtown | 630 Yates St.
Lekwungen territory

Out of Place delves into the relationships between the ground beneath our feet and the roofs over our heads. Through sculpture, photography and stop-motion projection, artist Connie Michele Morey explores ecological displacement (a colonial separation from the earth as home) and its impact on labour and housing dislocation. The exhibition grows out of tensions embodied in the artist’s mixed settler and Indigenous identity, alongside her personal experiences with housing insecurity. Emerging from travel to over fifty former village and industry sites on the east and west coasts of Canada, Out of Place questions what it means to be at home with the body, community, and earth. Image: Connie Morey, Roof Over My Head, Slag Heap, Coal Mine #1, K’omoks Traditional Territory (Comox Valley, BC), 2019.

Art of Reconciliation

April 30 – Sept 10 2022

Legacy Downtown Sidewalk Gallery | 630 Yates St.
Lekwungen territory

The Sidewalk Gallery is located outside Legacy Downtown in our Broad Street windows. 

Art of Reconciliation invites viewers to witness and participate in a dialogue with youth about what reconciliation means for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people working together to form friendships and take action. The artwork in this show is the result of weeks of reflection, group discussion and deep learning about reconciliation, Indigenous culture, and colonization.

Learn more about the Art of Reconciliation project

Image: Dahlila Charlie, Matriarch’s Dream, 2021. 

Natural | Supernatural: Nuu-chah-nulth Serigraph Prints from the University of Victoria’s Permanent Collection

Fall 2014 to Fall 2017

On the UVic campus at First Peoples House

Curated by Allison Grey Noble and Caroline Riedel

This exhibition of serigraph prints by artists Patrick Amos, Joe David, Ron Hamilton (Chuuchkamalthnii), Tim Paul, Art Thompson (Tsa-Qwass-Upp), and Glen Webster visually articulates knowledges of histories and stories that are important to the people of the Nuu-chah-nulth nations. These prints are from the university’s permanent collection and originate from the print making studio of Vincent Rickard, who worked with these artists in the 1980s and 1990s. Rickard and donors George and Christiane Smyth have given the university nearly 3,000 contemporary Northwest Coast prints, making UVic’s collection the most comprehensive in Canada.

Image: Supernatural, Joe David (Nuu-chah-nulth)